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Susan Smith
Susan Smith
Susan Smith has worked as an editor and writer in the technology industry for over 16 years. As an editor she has been responsible for the launch of a number of technology trade publications, both in print and online. Currently, Susan is the Editor of GISCafe and AECCafe, as well as those sites’ … More »

Google shares outrank Microsoft’s

 
October 11th, 2012 by Susan Smith

As the markets closed this Monday, Google (GOOG) shares are at $249.1 billion, much higher than Microsoft’s ($247.2 billion). Despite Microsoft’s healthy performance over the past year, in which shares are up nearly 20 percent, it is reporting it’s first ever quarterly loss since going public.

Industry experts say that although Windows 8 is debuting this month, the Windows platform is waning in popularity. Microsoft has been slow to pick up mobile, and now has come forth claiming that the new oeprating system will translate well from PCs to mobile devices.

Read the rest of Google shares outrank Microsoft’s

Crowdsource mapping allows locals to render geo-referenced data

 
October 2nd, 2012 by Susan Smith

Disaster management and emergency services can benefit greatly from Crowdsource Mapping, according to an article in the UN-SPIDER Newsletter. The idea is to collect data from as many on-site sources as possible and translate that real-time data into maps. Being aware of the surrounding and the infrastructure, locals can render accurate geo-referenced information or comment on existing data and thereby help disaster managers expand the information they need for emergency operations. That is of course not only true for on-going disasters, but also for risk assessment and preparedness efforts.

Crowdsource mapping UN-SPIDER Newsletter

Mobile mapping diverges with Apple and Google

 
September 25th, 2012 by Susan Smith

Apple’s iPhone 5 maps aren’t anywhere near as good as Google’s Maps, according to an article in ZDNet, but it doesn’t seem to matter because the two companies needed to separate since they are competitors in the mobile mapping market. What may occur however, is that new options might be in the stars.

Read the rest of Mobile mapping diverges with Apple and Google

CanWeNetwork launches new mobile business app

 
September 25th, 2012 by Susan Smith

Today CanWe Studios LLC, of Austin, TX, launched CanWeNetwork, a mobile app for business networking that uses geospatial technology and a powerful matching engine to recommend people nearby who you should meet for professional networking and business opportunities. This is an interesting development in the world of social business networking. Recommendations are based upon location, skillsets, shared interests and personality traits gleaned from LinkedIn profiles. If you are traveling, you might be able to visit people at organizations within close proximity to where you are staying. It would be easier to make those contacts than say, doing a Google search before you left on a trip. This geospatial technology encourages users to develop face-to-face connections that may lead to business connections.

CanWeNetwork is now available and can be downloaded in the Apple App Store and Android Market (Google Play) by visiting www.can.ws/go.

“Social networks have made us more connected than ever but have had the negative result of limiting real life experiences,” said James Sinclair, vice president, CanWe Studios. “We can take a users’ LinkedIn profile and identify, with a high degree of accuracy, people around them they should meet because they are likely to succeed together. The app uses the power of big data and mobile technology to see and capture actionable opportunities that without CanWeNetwork would simply pass you by unknown. We believe that conversations create opportunity and that’s what CanWeNetwork does, it creates conversations.”

CanWeNetwork utilizes the most in-depth proprietary engine available, developed in-house by a team that includes the scientist behind one of the leading online dating services. The engine builds complex models of users through its Open Developer program and other sources and augmenting LinkedIn data. It is then applying statistical analysis to the models to predict the kinds of people users are most likely to succeed with. Strong privacy controls gives users complete control of how and when they are contacted and by whom.

The app will run in the background of your mobile device and seek connections for the user. One might hope that source data other than LinkedIn data might be also used in order to extend the reach of CanWeNetwork, but it is definitely technology to watch.

This application is not affiliated with nor endorsed by LinkedIn Corporation

Climate Central’s new interactive wildfires map for the U.S.

 
September 24th, 2012 by Susan Smith

Now you can monitor wildfires that are currently burning with Climate Central’s new interactive wildfires map. The flame icons represent wildfires currently active in the lower 48 states and Alaska. See link below:

Climate Central’s interactive wildfire map

Location Intelligence offers insight into customers

 
September 18th, 2012 by Susan Smith

Location intelligence (LI) and near field communication (NFC) are helping marketers to get to know their customers in a way they never could before.

NFC and Location Intelligence – Direct Marketing

iPhone 5 buzz — not just when on vibrate

 
September 13th, 2012 by Susan Smith

The iPhone 5 is accompanied by a lot of buzz, and some of that is pretty exciting. Customers of past iPhone models will be pleased to know that the iPhone 5 is made of all glass and aluminum, making it the thinnest yet. It measures 7.6mm thick, 18 percent thinner than previous iterations. It features “Ultrafast Wireless,” thanks to GPRS, EDGE, EV-DO, HSPA, HSPA+, DC-HSDPA and LTE.

Read the rest of iPhone 5 buzz — not just when on vibrate

September 11 geospatial reflections

 
September 11th, 2012 by Susan Smith

Since September 11th, 2001, geospatial technology shifted its emphasis to be more focused on emergency response, disaster recovery, terrorist action and other domains of the federal, state and county governments. Indoor mapping derived from this event, when it became evident that knowing where assets were located in buildings, would be vitally important in a time of disaster or terrorist action. If there is any one single event that showed the need for geospatial information, this was it.

The need for disaster management and recovery has escalated with the greater number of natural disasters such as hurricanes, earthquakes, tornados, floods and other acts of nature that have torn the fabric of the U.S. as well as other countries. Geodesign has emerged since that time, tracking requirements for marrying geographic sciences with design professionals and information technologies and the data provided by the people in a geographic location. There must be some overlap of these perspectives which would not overlap if not for the desire to merge information into a cohesive whole.

Other disasters such as Hurricane Katrina, have shaped the way geographic information has been disseminated to the public. Each time one of these disasters hits, there is more to learn about how to disseminate information to the public, how to find resources during a disaster and how to save lives and manage the recovery from these events.

Facebook Search trembles in the wings

 
September 11th, 2012 by Susan Smith

Mark Zuckerberg, CEO of Facebook, practically announced that Facebook would have a search engine during the TechCrunch Disrupt conference in San Francisco. He also said that the last two years the company had wasted time building cross-platform mobile apps based on HTML5 rather than snappier, smoother native apps. He believes that more people will be using mobile than desktop applications, and is moving forward with that huge priority. They now have a native iPhone app that is based on code contributions to apps. He said he basically lives on his mobile phone himself.

  Facebook Search All But Announced by Mark ZuckerbergWired Magazine

GPS routing accuracy questioned

 
September 4th, 2012 by Susan Smith

In a recent article “Emergency rescuers: Use GPS devices with caution,” the message was really about what happened to Craig Matthews, who turned off a major highway in northern New Mexico last spring, whose remains were found in July by his girlfriend and another friend. Why? Matthews had been traveling north on Interstate 25 when he talked to his girlfriend, Debra Hughes, who lived in Penrose, Colorado. When Matthews didn’t return home, Hughes called search and rescue. A state game warden found his truck lodged in a snowdrift four days later about 44 miles off a remote side road, U.S. 64. He was found approximately 4/10 of a mile from the vehicle.

Hughes thinks Matthews got confused after he stopped for coffee in the town of Raton which is on the Interstate, and got on 64 instead of the Interstate. She thinks he turned on his GPS to direct him toward home.

Read the rest of GPS routing accuracy questioned

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