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Posts Tagged ‘GIS’

Located-Based Technology and Real-Time Election Mapping

Wednesday, October 19th, 2016

While the election plods on, behind the scenes there is a lot of geospatial technology being used to come up with various polls, real-time election maps, and determine election polling places that are helping people get to the polls and assist in the results reporting. Candidates, local and state governments are all trying to leverage the latest geographic and mapping solutions to better inform and motivate citizens, thereby changing election outcomes.

Electoral map 2016


ACLU Criticizes Social Media for Allowing Access to Content

Thursday, October 13th, 2016

An article this week in The New York Times Police Use Surveillance Tool to Scan Social Media about Chicago company Geofeedia’s use of text, photos and videos from social media outlets such as Facebook, Instagram and Twitter to aid in law enforcement sparks controversy about law enforcement vs. civil liberties.

The use of location technology to solve crimes is nothing new. The use of social media content in a specific location is relatively new, and a potent resource for law enforcement.

Is this a good thing or a bad thing, or is it, like all new technologies, fraught with the potential for misuse as well as for the common good? It is sort of like the case of the hammer: you can use it to build a house, or to hit someone over the head with it.

We have covered Geofeedia quite extensively in GISCafe news, for use in retail, public safety, disaster response and law enforcement etc. Additional uses for Geofeedia services remain to be seen, but it may be extremely helpful for averting violence at certain events.

Geofeedia Ads Leverages Location Data

Within Seconds, Geofeedia Customers Can Take Action on Data

It is really a case of, we have the technology, so how do we use it to its best advantage without damaging civil liberties of the individual?

Geofeedia’s tool allows users to search for social media content in a specific location, as opposed to searching by words or hashtags that would be less likely to identify an exact location.

Over 500 law enforcement agencies have signed up for Geofeedia’s solutions, according to the American Civil Liberties Union. The company shows how Baltimore officials were able to track and respond to violent protests that broke out after Freddie Gray died in police custody in April 2015, using their tool.

The ACLU reports says that Geofeedia has used programs freely offered by social media companies such as Facebook and Twitter that allow app developers or advertising companies to create third-party tools. In response to criticism from ACLU saying that social media companies have been “lax” in monitoring their data, social media companies say they’ve stopped Geofeedia’s access to their information.

According to The New York Times article: “These platforms should be doing more to protect the free speech rights of activists of color,” Matt Cagle, a lawyer with the A.C.L.U. in Northern California, said in an interview. “When they open their feeds to companies that market surveillance products, they risk putting their users in harm’s way.”

Each of the companies had a concern for how their data was being used. Instagram and Facebook terminated Geofeedia’s access to their data in September, while Twitter shut off access on Tuesday. The companies suggested that Geofeedia was using social media data in a way that was not allowed under their developer agreements. The public data made available by Facebook, for example, was subject to access limitations stated in the company’s platform policy. Developers are required to provide a privacy policy that details what data they are collecting and how the data is intended to be used. Consent is also required from people before using any Facebook technology that collects and processes data about them.

In response to this news, Team Geofeedia issued a blog entitled A Commitment to Freedom of Speech and Civil Liberties, in which it defined Geofeedia’s role as a “software platform that aims to provide important, real-time, publicly available information to a broad range of private and public sector clients, including corporations, media and journalism groups, marketing and advertising firms, educational companies, cities, schools, sports teams, and the aviation sector.”

Phil Harris, chief executive of Geofeedia, said in a statement that his company “provides some clients, including law enforcement officials across the country, with a critical tool in helping to ensure public safety while protecting civil rights and liberties.” He said the firm has policies to prevent “inappropriate use of our software.”

Mr. Harris added that the company understands that given how quickly digital technology changes, Geofeedia “must continue to work to build on these critical protections of civil rights.”

The blog states: “In each of these areas, Geofeedia is committed to the principles of personal privacy, transparency, and both the letter and the spirit of the law when it comes to individual rights. Our platform provides some clients, including law enforcement officials across the country, with a critical tool in helping to ensure public safety while protecting civil rights and liberties.

Notably, our software has also been used in response and recovery efforts – from the Boston Marathon to the effects of Hurricane Matthew that we saw this past weekend – to assist millions of people affected by both manmade and natural events.

Geofeedia has in place clear policies and guidelines to prevent the inappropriate use of our software; these include protections related to free speech and ensuring that end-users do not seek to inappropriately identify individuals based on race, ethnicity, religious, sexual orientation or political beliefs, among other factors. That said, we understand, given the ever-changing nature of digital technology, that we must continue to work to build on these critical protections of civil rights.

Geofeedia will continue to engage with key civil liberty stakeholders, including the ACLU, and the law enforcement community to make sure that we do everything in our power to support the security of the American people and the protection of personal freedoms.”

The ACLU got wind of the use of Geofeedia when 60+ law enforcement agency records revealed a significant expansion of social media surveillance.

“Posts on social media platforms can reveal information about our location, our religion, the people we associate with,” Cagle said. “Users of social media websites do not expect or want the government to be monitoring this information. And users should not be at risk of being branded a risk to public safety simply for speaking their mind on social media.”

The New York Times has used Geofeedia technology in the past, but stated that it has not used it since 2015.

Regardless of the threat to civil liberties, it does appear that such location-based information gleaned from social media is here to stay, for reasons of national security, community security, disaster response and recovery, etc. Thus it would seem policies to protect civil rights of individuals need to be quickly put in place. Geofeedia is not the only company providing this sort of surveillance. See our story in GISCafe Voice Vencore Aggregates Data from many Open Sources and Social Media





Hexagon Acquisition of GISquadrat GmbH Enhances Reach of Geospatial for Governments and Utilities in Europe

Thursday, October 6th, 2016

Hexagon Safety & Infrastructure acquired GISquadrat GmbH of Vienna, Austria. The acquisition is aimed at enhancing Hexagon’s geospatial, cloud and mobile solutions for governments and utility providers in Europe as well as bringing in more than 300 customers and thousands of users into the Hexagon fold.

hexagon_ignitebanner-702x336 (more…)

GoPro’s Karma Micro UAS to Launch in October

Wednesday, September 28th, 2016

The GoPro Karma quadcopter, a new micro UAS compatible with GoPro’s Hero4 Black+Silver, Hero5 Session and Hero5 Black camera offerings, is set to be released in October.

GoPro Karma

GoPro Karma


Subaru and TomTom Collaborate on 2017 InCar Infotainment System

Thursday, September 22nd, 2016

I have a new 2016 Subaru Forrester and just love it.

TomTom Maps and Navigation Software Power Subaru’s New Infotainment Platform (Photo: Business Wire)

TomTom Maps and Navigation Software Power Subaru’s New Infotainment Platform (Photo: Business Wire)


The GRACE Project Offers Up the Keweenaw Time Traveler with GIS

Tuesday, September 13th, 2016

The GRACE Project for the Upper Peninsula (GRACE for UP) of Keweenaw County, Michigan is an amazing project-model for GIS-based education, with high school students using Esri GIS on two related real-world community projects in celebration of the  100th Anniversary of the National Parks Celebration.


A Search Engine for Congress

Thursday, September 8th, 2016

The computer can show you how one senator has co-sponsored more bills of a Senate Majority Leader than any other senator over a period of years.  It can also show you who has the best record of getting bills out of committee – information that took years in the making to obtain ten years ago. Today, with a dashboard platform called Quorum Analytics, a startup developed a year ago by two then-Harvard undergraduates, Alex Wirth and Jonathan Marks, customers can have this information at their fingertips for far less time and money.

Quorum (more…)

Esri Web Maps Provide Forecasting for NOAA’s National Water Model

Tuesday, August 30th, 2016

About two weeks ago, Esri launched a collection of web maps that display NOAA forecast streamflow data for the continental U.S. NOAA’s recently released National Water Model. Data from the Model combined with the National Hydrography Dataset and fed by NOAA’s National Weather Service data, forecasts the flow of water along the 2.7 million stream segments in the continental U.S. in ArcGIS Online.

NWM_10_Day_Anomaly_2 (more…)

Earthquake Disaster Recovery Efforts for Italy

Friday, August 26th, 2016

A little hilltop town in Italy was putting the crowning preparations on their annual pasta festival, when the earthquake struck this week.



LGS Innovations Has Proactive Strategy to Fight Network Attacks

Thursday, August 18th, 2016

Network attacks of all kinds are on the rise, and it is imperative that organizations deploy a proactive, defense-in-depth strategy that addresses all layers of the network.

LGS Innovations recognizes the importance of network-level software integrity as a component of the larger network security ecosystem. With a dedication to the evolution of enterprise support born from extensive experience deploying secure, mission-critical switching solutions, LGS Innovations offers CodeGuardian™: a solution that hardens network devices at both the software source code and binary executable levels to enhance overall network security.

Through a partnership with Alcatel-Lucent Enterprise (ALE), worldwide enterprise communications organization, the LGS CodeGuardian solution has been applied to ALE’s OmniSwitch family of products, to harden these network devices at both the software source code and binary executable levels within. David Lau, software engineer manager, Product, Solutions and Applications, said the company has a long heritage with Bell Labs. They recently purchased Axios, a traditional networking group.


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