GISCafe Weekly Review August 18th, 2016

Network attacks of all kinds are on the rise, and it is imperative that organizations deploy a proactive, defense-in-depth strategy that addresses all layers of the network.

LGS Innovations recognizes the importance of network-level software integrity as a component of the larger network security ecosystem. With a dedication to the evolution of enterprise support born from extensive experience deploying secure, mission-critical switching solutions, LGS Innovations offers CodeGuardian™: a solution that hardens network devices at both the software source code and binary executable levels to enhance overall network security.

Through a partnership with Alcatel-Lucent Enterprise (ALE), worldwide enterprise communications organization, the LGS CodeGuardian solution has been applied to ALE’s OmniSwitch family of products, to harden these network devices at both the software source code and binary executable levels within. David Lau, software engineer manager, Product, Solutions and Applications, said the company has a long heritage with Bell Labs. They recently purchased Axios, a traditional networking group.

Offline Maps and How to Get Started Part 1
August 17, 2016  by Matt Sheehan

 

I thought it worthwhile pulling together a series of posts on offline maps and how to get started. This an area in which we have particular expertise.

Many of the most popular mobile apps available today include maps. Apps like Pokemon Go and Uber are two excellent examples. Built in GPS in smartphones and tablets has enabled users to ask a multitude of ‘where questions': Where is the closest PokéStop? Where is my Uber driver?

The popularity of consumer mobile mapping apps is now moving to the enterprise, to save money, or make money. GIS is a technology which quietly sits behind many mobile enterprise mapping apps. GIS generates maps from raw data and allows users to ask both simple and complex ‘where questions’. More on GIS later.

Offline Maps and How to Get Started Part 1

Mobile maps often rely on wireless connectivity to work. As an example, when you see your Uber driver heading towards your location on the map, quietly in the background your smartphone is getting information back over wireless on the changing location of that driver.

GIS Technology on its own is Useless
August 15, 2016  by Matt Sheehan

 

I’m troubled by fixed mindsets. Whether that be personal or corporate. I’m old enough to have experienced the dot com boom. Embedded tech ideas driven mostly by internal ‘brilliance’ than solving real client problems. The ‘if we build it they will come’ approach. Rather like the film Field of Dreams. Fiction!

GIS Technology on its own is Useless

I like the title of this blog post: GIS Technology on its own is Useless. We could take the GIS part of that title away. Technology helps to solve problems. It is not a solution on its own. Read that again.

If we throw technology over the fence at users/clients/colleagues does that solve their problem?

Today’s GIS technology is incredible. But it is only as useful as the problems we know how to solve using GIS. On its own GIS is useless.

GIS is an essential component in many decision and management processes. A well-structured GIS provides invaluable tools to visualize, analyze and query geospatial data and associated information about features and objects in both the natural and built environments. Because a GIS database can contain information on a wide variety of features and terrain, it is commonly built and maintained using information produced by a broad range of input and data sources.

As applications for GIS data expand, so does the demand for new and efficient ways to collect and deliver quality, actionable spatial data from the field. Satisfying the seemingly insatiable demand for data doesn’t always involve traditional GIS field technicians. Certain types of geospatial data can be produced by the general public. And in some cases, data collection doesn’t involve humans at all.

The Triple Play of Data Collection

Today’s widely available options for connectivity and Internet-based communications are enabling new approaches to collecting and using GIS information. We can divide the techniques into three broad classifications: crew sourced, crowd sourced and automated acquisition.

Now you can experience the advantages of a smartphone in a professional-grade rugged package for collecting data and inspecting assets in the field. The Trimble® TDC100—with Android OS— combines the benefits of a true GNSS receiver in a smartphone form factor to give you the spatial accuracy, all-day battery life and ruggedness traditional consumer-grade mobile phones won’t.
Racurs
University of Denver GIS Masters Degree Online
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