GIS Weekly Review April 19th, 2012

Intergraph
Location Intelligence USA, Chicago, June 14-15
Location Summit Amsterdam

At the Esri Federal User Conference 2012, Brett Rose demonstrates how to use lidar and terrain data for surveillance and situational awareness.

One of the most audacious projects ever to come out of Google was the plan to photograph and map the inhabited world, one block at a time. But a report over the weekend from federal regulators has rekindled questions over exactly what the company was doing — questions the search giant has spent years trying not to answer.

While Autodesk does not talk about GIS much these days, embedded in their Autodesk Infrastructure Design Suite 2013 is a Utilities Workflow that offers intelligent model based software for meeting the complex needs of the SmartGrid, with GIS products built in. The emphasis appears to be on helping transform planning, design and management processes by capturing conditions at the start of the design process, useful for both designers and GIS professionals.

Reflections on CalGIS 2012 & Mobile GIS
April 16, 2012  by Matt Sheehan


Just back from CalGIS in Sacramento. An interesting two day conference. Our presentation; ‘Is mobile the Future of GIS?” was one of the last sessions on the Friday. Its a shame since we gave an overview of the mobile market space; in hindsight it would have been better positioned early in the conference. Even so, we still managed a good sized audience.

Is Mobile The Future of GIS?

The conference was made up of a cross section of GIS focused organisations across the state; both public and private. We were interested to see which themes were most discussed, and gauge where mobile fits into a traditionally web/desktop GIS focused conference.

The Geospatial Sector Faces the Music
April 16, 2012  by Mladen Stojic, President of Hexagon Geospatial

When thinking about the music business thirty years ago, only a handful of musical genres could be purchased as vinyl records or 8-track cassettes at the “record store.”  The platform quickly progressed from cassette tapes to compact discs and ultimately to the digital files, and the brick and mortar store has ultimately been replaced by e-commerce.  In terms of genres, we have so many variations of music that it’s virtually impossible to truly categorize all types.

Not only have music deliverables, varieties, and accessibility rapidly progressed, but also the industry itself – transitioning from a hierarchy of those recorded and promoted to a truly DIY approach, with intuitive tools for capturing music and endless vehicles for self-promotion courtesy of social media.  While many in the music industry balked at the rapid radical changes (fearing lost revenue), demand sparked innovation, enabling the masses to embrace and utilize technology as it emerged.

The importance of U.S. commercial satellite imagery
April 13, 2012  by Susan Smith

High resolution imagery of sub-meter – less than 40 inches – is only available from GeoEye, DigitalGlobe, Astrium Geo, and ImageSat. It is what the stuff of Google is made of. GeoEye and DigitalGlobe represent approximately 75% of this market, and 2/3 of their revenue is tied to the U.S.  government. There are lots of free, government sources of satellite imagery like Landsat, and weather satellites from NASA and NOAA, but these are not high-resolution satellites that can zoom in on your house, or support 3D modeling for engineering and virtual reality-type applications.

Read about why U.S. commercial satellite imagery is important:

The Fate of U.S. Commercial Satellite Imagery – and why you should care LBx Journal

 

Envisat stops sending data to earth
April 13, 2012  by Susan Smith

After just having celebrated its 10th anniversary of service on 1 March 2012, ESA’s Envisat stopped sending data to earth. The last contact between the satellite and the ground station in Kiruna, Sweden was established on Sunday, ever since no data has been received. ESA’s mission control is working to re-establish contact with the satellite. Launched in 2002, Envisat has orbited Earth more than 50 000 times delivering thousands of images and other data used for example for climate change studies or natural disaster mitigation supporting more than 4000 projects in over 70 countries.

One of the last images to be transmitted before the loss of contact. Picture: ESA

 

Intergraph
ITT Exelis
ESRI


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