GIS Weekly Review May 24th, 2012

John Hopkins University

The following 4 presentations were given at the 2012 Esri Developer Summit. They cover the 4 main industries:

  • Local Government
  • Defence
  • Transportation
  • Water utilities

In the first presentation, Christian Carlson and Scott Oppmann present ArcGIS for Local Government and its set of downloadable maps and apps.

Choosing a Mobile GIS Solution
May 24, 2012  by Sanjay Gangal

Tom Brenneman and Lloyd Heberlie give tips on selecting the best mobile solution for your industry. This presentation was recorded at the 2012 Esri Developer Summit in March, 2012.

Developers face a choice between Javascript, ArcGIS Mobile, ArcGIS for iOS, Android, Windows phone, HTML5, etc. Tom & Lloyd help developers understand their options for Mobile GIS, and help then ask the right set of questions to make a decision for a mobile platform. They walk you through a number of mobile solution scenarios and present a number of mobile development options.

The Power of Python
May 23, 2012  by Sanjay Gangal

Jason Pardy provides an overview of how Python is used within the ArcGIS system. This video was recorded at the 2012 Esri Developer Summit in March, 2012.

Killer Apps: HTML5 and Flex
May 23, 2012  by Sanjay Gangal

Sajit Thomas and Mansour Raad share several GIS applications designed to stimulate ideas in your own development efforts. This video was recorded at the 2012 Esri Developer Summit in March, 2012.

Sajit and Mansour keep the session lively with a lot of jokes and cool graphics. You will not fall asleep watching this hour-long presentation.

Sajit Thomas - UX Architect @ Esri

Mansour Raad - Senior Software Architect @ Esri

Here are two presentations from the 2012 Esri Developer Summit Technical Workshops.

In the first presentation, Divesh Goyal and Mark Dostal show how to extend the reach of your GIS to the Apple iOS touch platform.

Morten Nielsen previews the efforts being made with ArcGIS Runtime SDK within Windows 8 Metro style applications.

Windows 8 essentially runs in two different modes — one is like the traditional windows environment in Windows 7.

The second mode is the Metro style. The Metro style apps are designed to be full screen, beautiful, connected to the people and content you care about, interactive and touch-first, and work in a variety of layouts and form factors. Metro style apps takes center stage, while the operating system remains in the background.

One of our most popular posts has been the announcement of the integration of Pictometry with AutoCAD Map 3D in 2011. Pictometry Integration for AutoCAD Map 3D 2012 allows users to plan and design assets without leaving the Map 3D environment.

Maptitude’s Stewart Berry spoke recently with GISCafe Voice regarding their latest Maptitude intelligent geographic information system release.

 

Building Mobile GIS Apps using Titanium
May 22, 2012  by Matt Sheehan


We build custom cross platform mobile GIS and location based mobile applications. There is our one sentence elevator sales pitch. But what is this cross platform business? Put simply write one code base and run it across multiple platforms. So take your beautiful mobile web application written in HTML5/Javascript convert it to an installed app using Phonegap. Distribute it to the various app stores and you are done. You have created a hybrid mobile app. So why all the fuss over native apps? These are apps written in the language of choice of a specific platform; Objective C for iOS, Java for Android. So multiple versions of the same app need writing for each platform. These sound expensive to write and maintain. As with all things there are advantages and disadvantages of each approach.

Esri Maps for Microsoft Office
May 21, 2012  by Sanjay Gangal

Esri Maps for Office is a new product that allows you to quickly create dynamic, interactive maps of your Excel data and start exploring it in a whole new way. Esri Maps for Office enables you to uncover patterns and trends not evident in tabular data and charts. The process of creating a map in Excel is painless, and is much the same as creating a graph or chart of your data. Maps can be shared immediately through PowerPoint presentations or by one-click publishing to Esri’s mapping cloud, ArcGIS Online. This workshop will demonstrate the value of the product using a number of use case scenarios.

Art Hadaad

Karymsky Volcano image from EO-1 satellite
May 18, 2012  by Susan Smith

Karymsky Volcano has erupted regularly for more than ten years. This natural-color satellite image shows the volcano’s typical low-level activity. A white gas plume rises above Karmymsky’s summit, and fresh volcanic material coats the eastern slopes. This image was acquired by the Advanced Land Imager (ALI) aboard theEarth Observing -1 (EO-1) satellite on May 3, 2012.

A veteran soldier I respect told me the story of receiving a care package, years ago, while serving in the jungle. Imagine his surprise and laughter when he noticed that the care package included bottles of bubble bath! No doubt, the giver’s heart was in the right place; the gift just wasn’t practical. While this is an exaggeration, there is some truth to it. For the intelligence professional who desires to provide timely, focused, and relevant products, there are some helpful questions to ask to ensure that all products are practical for use. All involve a little empathy—the ability to place oneself in the customer’s position.

Questions every intelligence professional should ask:

  1. What is the customer’s mission? Is he/she protecting a fuel delivery convoy, or pulling security at corps headquarters? Is this a humanitarian mission, such as a mobile medical team, or a raid to apprehend an enemy insurgent? This knowledge will help tailor the product(s) to the right audience.
  2. What kind of bandwidth can this customer support? A Special Forces team at a forward operating base (FOB) may or may not be able to receive sophisticated products such as detailed imagery, which requires excessive bandwidth. Meanwhile, a customer at a main operating base may have no bandwidth restrictions.
  3. How much time does the customer have? Selected Special Forces NCOs, called 18Fs, undergo excellent intelligence training. Still, in a tactical scenario, the team’s 18F likely has other responsibilities. Intelligence is not a full-time job. The client cannot focus solely on intelligence matters. He/she may need simple, relevant, well-marked products that brief themselves. (For example, PowerPoint slides should include complete sentences instead of bulleted phrases.) In other cases, the customer may wish to cut and paste portions of the product into working products.
  4. What customer need does the product fulfill? Does it answer a question the customer is asking? Any intelligence product is useless without a “so what” purpose. Is it to inform the customer? Is it to allow a decision maker to make a choice or assume a risk? If the product does not answer this question, it is useless.
  5. It is always appropriate to contemplate security considerations. After all, legend tells us that the Mongols got over the Great Wall of China by simply bribing selected guards. What is the highest level of classification that the customer’s computer can support? Can he/she move a classified product from one system to another? Does the client have a SCIF or tactical “TSCIF”? Does he/she have the ability to store any classified materials?
  6. What kind of enemy threat exists? Is the customer located on a secure compound, or forward under stealth in enemy territory? A customer on a secure base can make a lot of noise, hang products on the wall, and use multiple computers. A sniper or small tactical unit, on the other hand, might not even be able to “light up” a Tough Book, due to enemy threats.
  7. What kind of training does the customer have? Does it include intelligence training? Again, an 18F has excellent training and knows jargon and abbreviations like PIRs (Priority Intelligence Requirements), LTIOV (Latest Time Information of Value), OCOKA (Observation and Fields of Fire, Cover and Concealment, Obstacles, Key Terrain, and Avenues of Approach), and ICP (Intelligence Collection Plan). A coalition tactical element may need basic, clear products in simple English, with no slang.
ESRI


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