GISCafe Weekly Review August 30th, 2012

Understanding Our Changing World with Dynamic Spatial Modeling
August 29, 2012  by Mladen Stojic, President of Hexagon Geospatial

Understanding our world requires us to model and interpret the spatial relationships between human, social and physical geography. We live in a connected world of spatial and non-spatial relationships, and it is essential that we be conscious of these relationships, as this helps us to grasp the impact of our decisions on our daily lives.

Because we live in a world where human, social and physical geography is always changing, we need a way to dynamically understand our changing world.  A change requires us to assess the effect that event has had on the geography. Many times, this involves simulating, predicting, preventing and even influencing positive change.

Spatial modeling tools are a prerequisite to dynamically modeling and understanding our changing earth. Spatial modeling is the process of using spatial operators on a variety of geospatial datasets (for example, imagery, terrain and features) to create an information product. This involves using a set of procedures that simulates real-world conditions within a geospatial application, using the spatial relationships of geographic features and their attributes. From these created models, you can perform spatial analysis to derive information from data, such as distributions or patterns, using the spatial context of the problem. Actionable decisions require real information – not just data – and spatial modeling is key in driving these decisions.

NOAA researchers have a new instrument unofficially named “Seahorse” that is used on the ocean floor to study sea scallops. Named Seahorse because it is spiny and curved, the instrument is a sophisticated, up-to-date version of a survey system developed at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and used on sea scallop resource surveys conducted by NOAA’s Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC).


We put up a blog post linking to a recently released UN paper entitled:

Future Trends in Geospatial Information Management: The Five to Ten Year Vision

We noted in the original post that without knowing who the list of experts who contributed to the paper were, we were a little hesitant. We do know that Peter Batty added his thoughts. A good guy, but somebody who still talks about, the rather controversial, neoGeography or “new geography”.

Anyway, we digress. After reading the paper a number of times, we felt a little. Well. Deflated. We regard the new world of location technology as very exciting. The paper made for some dry reading; ok it was for the UN and not meant to have us all jumping for joy. But we hoped for a realistic, useful reflection on where the geospatial world is moving. Too much felt like wild guesses, repetition of the obvious, and the unimportant. Ok, we are being harsh, but this is a panel of experts. We expected some expert insight.

Mobile apps for tracking Hurricane Isaac
August 28, 2012  by Susan Smith

Hurricane Isaac has shifted its path from threatening Florida and the Republican National Convention and has moved far west, now following a path through the Gulf very similar to the one Hurricane Katrina traveled seven years ago.

It is predicted to be a weaker Category One storm when it makes landfall, with sustained winds of between 74 and 95 miles per hour, yet it’s still said to be a hurricane. The hurricane is prompting the governors of Alabama, Louisiana and Mississippi to declare emergencies (and in Alabama’s case, the governor to order mandatory coastal evacuations).

Streamlined Geospatial Technologies Enable Better Decision Making
August 27, 2012  by Mladen Stojic, President of Hexagon Geospatial

More than ever before, we can sense the real world around us – from space, the air, and the ground.  Organizations need the right solutions for managing this data influx to both make sense of the changing world and smarter decisions in the face of any challenge.

Often, geospatial professionals are required to work with disparate products that may not work well together.  The best way to manage this change is to leverage a portfolio of systems and solutions that integrate geospatial image processing and analysis, GIS, remote sensing, and photogrammetry.

Intergraph recently hosted a webinar that illustrated how our current solutions meet this need, as well as introduced new innovations that will be included in our upcoming release.

Global climate change on the Atlantic coast is in fast-forward mode  — swamping and eroding beaches, wetlands and farm fields, according to scientists. Shorelines from North Carolina to Boston are in a ‘hotspot’ for sea-level rise and will see water levels rise at double the rate of most places on the planet, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. What is the cause of this is a double geological activity.

Esri Hurricane Isaac map available
August 27, 2012  by Susan Smith

Esri’s Hurricane tracking map offers continuously updated hurricane information that shows the projected paths, storm surge, weather warnings, and precipitation.

Esri Public Information Map Tracking Hurricane Isaac

Optech


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