GISCafe Weekly Review April 12th, 2012

Think computing – mobile, social and the cloud
April 12, 2012  by Susan Smith

A bevy of new “consumer” customers fueled by the mobile, social and cloud platforms may be behind Autodesk’s financial success for 2011.

The Autodesk Media Summit held in San Francisco two weeks ago trumpeted news of the latest Autodesk 2013 product suites and products launch. CEO Carl Bass opened the Summit with some business results, big trends, followed by specific product information by Amar Hanspal. There is a video and partial transcription available on AECCafe Today

To reiterate what was covered in the opening keynote, last year Autodesk finished 2011 with revenue of about $2.2 billion. Bass said that in forecasting the economy he had predicted they would grow by about 10 percent last year, “I got a lot of grief from financial community because they didn’t think we could grow by 10 percent,” he said. “People were still worried about what going on with financial matters in the U.S. as well as in Europe. There was a sense the financial world was coming to the end – as it turns out we finished the year with 14 percent. Business was robust around the world, particularly a resurgence of economy in the U.S.”

Creating 3D Content with Esri CityEngine
April 9, 2012  by Sanjay Gangal

Thomas Oaks demonstrates how to easily build 3D content with CityEngine at the Esri Fed GIS Conference in Washington DC in February.

Esri CityEngine is a stand-alone software product that provides professional users in architecture, urban planning, entertainment, GIS and general 3D content production with a unique conceptual design and modeling solution for the efficient creation of 3D cities and buildings.

Article source: 

Eric Gundersen gave this presentation at the Where 2012 Conference in San Francisco last week.

Eric coordinates product development for MapBox, the platform that let anyone make fast and beautiful maps and share them anywhere. He is passionate about open data and building open source data visualization tools that focus on speed and hot design. He’s also the co-founder of Development Seed, a creative data visualization team based in Washington, DC.

Article source: 

Leila Janah gave this inspirational presentation at the Where 2012 Conference in San Francisco last week.

She is the founder of Samasource, a social business that connects over 550 women, youth, and refugees living in poverty to microwork — small, computer-based tasks that build skills and generate life-changing income. Samasource was a winner in the Stanford Social Enterprise Challenge in 2008 and is a current grantee of the Rockefeller Foundation. In recognition of her work, Leila received the Rainer Arnhold Fellowship and has been invited to serve as a TED and Social Enterprise Institute Fellow. Janah is a frequent speaker on social entrepreneurship, technology, and international development at institutions including MIT, the Stanford Graduate School of Business, UC Berkeley, Columbia, and Harvard. Her work has been profiled by CBS, CNN, The New York Times, The New Scientist, and GOOD, and she is a regular contributor to the Huffington Post and Social Edge.

Article source: 

Tim O’Reilly and Jon Bruner talk about big data and location at Where 2012.

Tim O’Reilly is the founder and CEO of O’Reilly Media, Inc., thought by many to be the best computer book publisher in the world. Over the years, Tim has built a culture where sustainable innovation is a key tenet of business philosophy. His active engagement with technology communities both drives the company’s product development and informs its marketing.

Tim is on the board of Safari Books Online and is a partner in O’Reilly AlphaTech Ventures.

Tim graduated from Harvard College in 1975 with a B.A. cum laude in classics. His honors thesis explored the tension between mysticism and logic in Plato’s dialogues.

Interview with Brady Forrest @ Where 2012
April 9, 2012  by Sanjay Gangal

Article source: 

Brady Forrest is Program Chair for O’Reilly’s Where and co-chair for Android Open . Additionally, he co-chaired the Web 2.0 Expo in San Francisco and NYC. Brady writes for O’Reilly Radar tracking changes in technology. He previously worked at Microsoft on Live Search (he came to Microsoft when it acquired MongoMusic). Brady lives in Seattle, where he builds cars for Burning Man and runs Ignite. You can track his web travels at Truffle Honey.

Here is his interview at the Where 2012 Conference held in San Francisco last week:


Building and Sharing Dynamic Maps
April 9, 2012  by Sanjay Gangal

Suzanne Foss demonstrates the ArcGIS 10.1 tools for integrating data into your maps at the 2012 Esri Fed GIS Conference in Washington DC in February.

GIS = Providing Location Based Solutions
April 6, 2012  by Matt Sheehan


It seems the blog post we wrote recently entitled “Should we retire the term GIS?” resonated with the geo-community. We thought is worth a follow up post.

First the responses. Below are a few on the comments we received:

“No. I saw this a few months ago (maybe from the same group; maybe not). This came from a location based services firm – so that’s why they want to change it. GIS is still the main term to use, for what I do at least; and folks can still use lots of sub terms if they want.”

“I’ve also heard geospatial technologies (geospatial being duplicative). But GIS includes the concept of analysis, where location does not. Location Based Solutions are applications, while GIS is analysis – how about “Geographic and Location Based Solutions?”)”

“True, I completely agree. GIS is not only a niche term, it is a discipline which occupies the time of people aged 55+ dealing with sub millimeter accuracy, INSPIRE (I prefer to call it EXPIRE), land management and maybe utilities. It has nothing to do with crowd sourcing (OSM), modern technology (mobile apps, SOA, Cloud) or “new” markets (Business GIS, LBS etc.). GIS people are still looking for that “killer app”, but cannot find it. Call it location services, Spatial Business Intelligence or whatever: the people in the industry need to change. We do still need the “55+ sub millimeter” people. Mainly for accuracy and standards.”

“I agree with most of what you have to say except I disagree that the term GIS should be retired. What I’d like to see is the use of specific terms where appropriate (like LBS as you’ve suggested) instead of using GIS as a catch-all for all things spatial. Just my two cents.”

Very interesting. Actually (counter to the first comment above) we have historically been an ESRI focused company. We wrote our first Web based ESRI map viewer (for the US Forest Service) back in 1997. Long, long before the term location based services (LBS) had been coined. Maybe this is at the crux of the discussion. Mobile has made us rethink our mission. We are a company started by geographers. Ok, we have a more diverse group together now, but geography remains at the heart of our work. Our focus is understanding better, and visualizing the space around us.

Geography, space, location, place. With my mobile in hand, I want information about what or who is near me. I want to run analysis based on my current lat/long. Is that handled by a GIS, LBS or other geo-backend? I care little, I just know that my current location is the centre of my focus. Whether I am a public utility worker trying to visualize an underground pipe (layer) and run a network analysis to find the valves which feed the pipe beneath my feet. Or I’m simply trying to see which friends are within a certain distance of my current location. With mobile everything is about location.

We are at the beginning of a geo-sector boom. Its a boom which is driven by mobile, centred on location. Nobody cares about the tags attached to the technology which provides the solutions. Users just want the solutions. And they are location based solutions.

Feel free to let us know your thoughts.

Already this spring there have been wildfires reported in the western states. According to the National Interagency Fire Center<http://www.nifc.gov/>, more than 82,000 wildfires occurred across 10 million acres in the U.S. last year.

Intergraph
ESRI


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