GIS Weekly Review May 17th, 2012

Article source: Worldmap

The WorldMap platform is being developed by the Center for Geographic Analysis (CGA) at Harvard to lower barriers for scholars who wish to explore, visualize, edit, collaborate with, and publish geospatial information.  WorldMap is Open Source software.

The system attempts to fill a growing niche between powerful desktop-bound mapping applications, and lightweight web map solutions with limited capacity.

If you find WorldMap data or technology useful in your research we would love to hear from you.  Understanding how the system is being used and where it needs improvement is critical as we evolve the system together.

WorldMap provides researchers with the ability to:

  • Upload large datasets and overlay them up with thousands of other layers
  • Create and edit maps and link map features to rich media content
  • Share edit or view access with small or large groups
  • Export data to standard formats
  • Make use of powerful online cartographic tools
  • Georeference paper maps online (http://warp.worldmap.harvard.edu)
  • Publish one’s data to the world or to just a few collaborators

Overview of WorldMap - a talk given to ABCD Harvard Technology group by Ben Lewis in November, 2011.

Article source: 

This is a tutorial by Suzanne Blier and Ben Lewis of Harvard University showing how to create map layers, link to media (such as images and video), label, and symbolize features within WorldMap.

In Explorer Online map tips are enabled
May 16, 2012  by Susan Smith

Esri’s Bernie Szukalski says map tips are enabled when you use Explorer Online, and are currently not supported in the ArcGIS.com map viewer (though with just a click you can display what you see in the map tip and more). Map tips work with feature layers, including “map notes” and other feature layers you create, derive, or connect to.

Better map tips using explorer online

LightSquared Inc. recently had lost the approval of the Federal Communications Commission to convert airwaves originally designated for satellite service to spectrum for land-based radio towers in February. The FCC withdrew approval for the company’s network after government tests found that the signals would interfere with global-positioning systems. Now Lightsquared has filed for bankruptcy, saying it “will seek to resolve the concerns of U.S. regulators who thwarted the company’s plan to deliver high-speed wireless to as many as 260 million people.”

According to the story, LightSquared, based in Reston, Virginia, listed assets of $4.48 billion and debt of $2.29 billion as of Feb. 29 in a Chapter 11 filing today in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Manhattan. Besides its head to head battle with the FCC, Lightsquared has had financial difficulties. Creditors have requested that the company’s backer, Philip Falcone, step aside. In spite of that request, Falcone and the current management team will remain with the company, according to company spokesmen.

Bankruptcy “is intended to give LightSquared sufficient breathing room to continue working through the regulatory process that will allow us to build our 4G wireless network,” Chief Financial Officer Marc Montagner said in a statement. Reaching agreements with U.S. agencies may take as long as two years, he said in court papers.

-Bloomberg

Historical coverage of LightSquared in GISVoice:

Controversial LightSquared goes before House subcommittee

Going where no GPS has gone before

 

 

Longview, Texas resident have a map of all the current service requests throughout their city with the CitySend Service Request System from a widget created by CitySourced. Users can hover over any pin on the map to get detailed information about a service request. Gray pins mean the requests have been closed.

Is Google Maps GIS Lite?
May 11, 2012  by Matt Sheehan


We’ve never been a company which sits on its hands and wonders what is around the corner. Sure we have some key partners, but they don’t limit our reach and exploration. Our goal is to provide the most appropriate solution to our clients. That might be an ESRI solution, Google, MapQuest, technology combination, open source. We are continually working to expand our skills and add more tools to our geospatial toolbox. The more tools we have available, the more effective we are at picking the right tool for the job. (we all know using pliers as a hammer is never ideal.)

In the past we have leaned on the likes of ESRI’s ArcGIS Server (and their various web mapping APIs) as well as some of the more advanced open-source options like GeoServer, OpenLayers, OpenScales, etc. But things are changing. Attend any GIS focused conference and you will notice two things. First, that ESRI now talk about “non GIS users”, and not just in passing; all the time. And second that Google are usually there in one form or other. After chatting with one senior Google geo person we decided to look at their offering in greater depth.

Trimble® Pro series
ESRI


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