GISCafe Weekly Review December 22nd, 2016

The rapid evolution of geospatial technologies brings to mind a Yogi Berra quote: “When you come to a fork in the road, take it.” Berra made the remark while giving directions to his home—either choice would take you to Berra’s home in the same amount of time. Like many “Yogi-isms” that blended wisdom and counterintuitive logic, this quote carried a deeper message: Seemingly divergent paths can lead to the same result.

Berra’s advice especially strikes a chord with geospatial data collection, where GIS and other positioning professionals can choose from a pair of approaches to gathering data in the field. Purpose-built data collection devices, which have been the norm for a decade or more, are now sharing the stage with Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) solutions such as consumer-grade smartphones and tablets.

Both are good options. The happy dilemma lies in determining which approach provides the best route to the objective: efficiently gathering accurate information that can be quickly provided to the people who need and use it.

There are convincing arguments both for BYOD and commercial data collection solutions. On the commercial side, specialized field hardware such as the Trimble® Geo7 series GNSS handheld is rugged and well suited for operation in challenging environments. The displays and keyboards provide good visibility in sunlight and perform well under difficult conditions. The devices can run task-specific software provided by manufacturers such as Trimble and Esri. Alternatively, software development kits (SDKs) and application programming interfaces (APIs) enable third-party developers to create their own specialized applications for the rugged units.

Aerial Imagery from Far and Wide: A Story Map
December 21, 2016  by Jen Meli

Esri Map small

Each month at EagleView®, we share an image from our annual Pictometry® calendar on our blog. For the 2016 calendar, we selected 12 of our favorite aerial images out of more than 28 million captured in the 2014-2015 season.

Our 2016 calendar displays the diverse terrain found all across North America: deserts and mountains, canals and lakes, farmlands and cityscapes, islands and ocean bays.

Seeing one aerial photograph per month is one way to experience the spectacular Pictometry imagery we capture. But it doesn’t quite show just how far we travel to bring our customers industry-leading imagery and data.

4 ArcGIS Hits and Misses (and what we learned)
December 19, 2016  by Matt Sheehan

At years end I always like to reflect. Looking back what have we learned?

I believe 2016 was a year of growing pains for geospatial. So how did those growing pains express themselves in our business, and our work with ArcGIS. That’s what we will discuss in this blog post.

ArcGIS Hits and Misses (and what we learned)

Let’s present some short case studies. I’ll use our GIS Solutions Pyramid shown below to help colour the picture so to speak of each project.

arcgis-solutions-pyramid1. ArcGIS for Investment Company
Problem/Vision: The client wanted to map the location of power plants in a number of Asian countries. Initially the goal was to use web maps to help with client presentations. So visualization or the lower 2 tiers of our solutions pyramid. The client wanted help getting started.

Client GIS Expertise and Data: The client had no in-house GIS expertise. Public data was to be used as the source to build maps.

Trimble
Teledyne Optech
University of Denver GIS Masters Degree Online
Teledyne:


You are registered as: [_EMAIL_].

CafeNews is a service for GIS professionals. GISCafe.com respects your online time and Internet privacy. Edit or Change my newsletter's profile details. Unsubscribe me from this newsletter.

Copyright © 2017, Internet Business Systems, Inc. — 25 North 14th Steet, Suite 710 San Jose, CA 95112 — +1 (408) 882-6554 — All rights reserved.