Recalled Fire Hydrants Go Unrepaired: Poor GIS Data Contributor to Problem

PORT ST. LUCIE, Fla., June 28, 2016 — (PRNewswire) — 43 major hydrant recalls have been issued since 1999, affecting hundreds of thousands of these critical fire fighting devices- but almost half have never been inspected or repaired to resolve the offending problem.  The main reason: municipalities nationwide often do not know specifically where these faulty hydrants are located.

Most of the recalls involve internal hydrant issues making them hard or impossible to operate over time, which could force fire fighters to seek alternate water sources during a blaze.  This water search adds time, and could make all the difference between beating a fire or losing to it.

Limited data from hydrant manufacturers indicate recall programs are only about 60% effective, meaning a significant number of faulty devices are still out there and unaccounted for.

The heart of the issue is municipal hydrant asset databases:  what fire fighting devices does a city have in its inventory, and where are they physically located?

"During the past 25 years, many cities have made it a high priority to catalog and plot important key municipal features using GIS- geographic information system- mapping.  Fire hydrants are just one of these key GIS asset features," said Mark Voigtsberger, President of UT/GIS. "The problem is, many cities failed to collect certain fundamental information about the hydrants such as manufacturer, model, and year cast- all crucial information needed to identify specific units falling under these 43 recall notices." 

Cities can often produce an electronic GIS map showing the locations of all their hydrants, and the global positioning system (GPS) latitude and longitude values are generally accurate and correct.  However, many cannot extract from that data set specific hydrant makes and models.  Voigtsberger points to one large municipality with close to 60,000 hydrants:  "This city collected over 100 features on each individual fire hydrant- but none of it useful in pinpointing recalled units.  15 data fields alone were dedicated to tax and political divisions within the city.  Many other fields were simply administrative information." 

"This city will be required to physically visit each of the 60,000 locations to determine if, and how many, of their hydrants fall or have fallen under a recall," continued Voigtsberger. "They may have none, but they could have thousands.  Gathering the correct GIS data initially could have prevented these needed re-visits."
Many other cities will have to do the same and visit each location to ensure 100% of their recalled fire hydrants have been inspected and remediated.

It should be noted all hydrant manufacturers do an excellent job with their product recalls, providing repair parts for free and enough money to offset the calculated labor costs needed to make the fixes.  However, they cannot tell you where their products are located in your city.

ContactMark Voigtsberger, President
(888) 78-UTGIS

PO Box 881585
Port St Lucie, FL, 34988-1585

To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:




Review Article Be the first to review this article

Featured Video
Currently No Featured Jobs
Upcoming Events
Commercial UAV Expo 2016 at MGM Grand Hotel Conference Center Las Vegas NV - Oct 31 - 2, 2016
GIS-Pro 2016: URISA's 54th Annual Conference at Toronto Canada - Oct 31 - 3, 2016
24th ACM SIGSPATIAL International Conference at San Francisco Bay Area, California, USA San Francisco - Oct 31 - 3, 2016
Textron - Countless CAD add-ons, plug-ins and more.

Internet Business Systems © 2016 Internet Business Systems, Inc.
595 Millich Dr., Suite 216, Campbell, CA 95008
+1 (408)-337-6870 — Contact Us, or visit our other sites:
AECCafe - Architectural Design and Engineering EDACafe - Electronic Design Automation TechJobsCafe - Technical Jobs and Resumes  MCADCafe - Mechanical Design and Engineering ShareCG - Share Computer Graphic (CG) Animation, 3D Art and 3D Models
  Privacy Policy